Yönetim Temelleri Alternate Problems Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e 2- 1 © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 CHAPTER 2 ALTERNATE PROBLEMS Problem 2.1A Preparing and Evaluating a Balance Sheet Listed below in random order are the items to be included in the balance sheet of Deep River Lodge at December 31, 2003: Equipment .......................... $ 9,000 Buildings ............................. $430,000 Land ...................................... 1 40,000 Capital Stock .................................... ? Accounts Payable .................... 27,400 Cash ........................................... 9,100 Accounts Receivable ................. 3,300 Furnishings .............................. 22,600 Salaries Payable ...................... 13,200 Notes Payable ........................ 217,000 Interest Payable ......................... 4,000 Retained Earnings ................. 202,400 Instructions Prepare a balance sheet at December 31, 2003. Include a proper heading and organize a. your balance sheet similar to the illustrations shown in the Chapter 2. (After “ Buildings, ” you may list the remaining assets in any order.) You will need to compute the amount to be shown for retained earning s. Assume that no payment is due on the notes payable until 2005. Does this balance sheet b. indicate that the company is in a strong financial position as of December 31, 2003? Explain briefly.2- 2 Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.2A Interpreting the Effects of Business Transactio ns Six transactions of Brigal Company, a corporation, are summarized below in equation form, with each of the six transactions identified by a letter. For each of the transactions (a) through (f) write a separate statement explaining the nature of the tr ansaction. For example, the explanation of transaction a could be as follows: Purchased furniture for cash at a cost of $800. Assets = Liabilities + Owners ’ Equity Cash + Accounts Receivable + Land + Building + Furniture = Accounts Payable + Capital S tock Balances (a) $9,000 -800 $30,000 $40,000 $90,000 $10,000 +800 $30,000 $149,000 Balances (b) $8,200 +500 $30,000 -500 $40,000 $90,000 $10,800 $30,000 $149,000 Balances (c) $8,700 -3,000 $29,500 $40,000 $90,000 $10,800 +5,000 $30,000 +2,000 $149,000 Balances (d) $5,700 -2,000 $29,500 $40,000 $90,000 $15,800 $32,000 -2,000 $149,000 Balances (e) $3,700 +10,000 $29,500 $40,000 $90,000 $15,800 $30,000 $149,000 +10,000 Balances (f) $13,700 $29,500 $40,000 $90,000 $15,80 0 +3,000 $30,000 +3,000 $159,000 Balances $13,700 $29,500 $40,000 $90,000 $18,800 $33,000 $159,000Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e 2- 3 © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.3A Recording the Effects of Transactions Delta Corporation was organized on December 1 of the current year and had the following acc ount balances at December 31, listed in tabular form: Assets = Liabilities + Owners ’ Equity Cash + Land Building + Office Equipment = Notes Payable + Accounts Payable + Capital Stock Balances $12,000 $80,000 $66,000 $41,300 $42,000 $7,300 $150, 000 Early in January, the following transactions were carried out by Delta Corporation: Sold capital stock to owners for $40,000. 1. Purchased land and a small office building for a total price of $80,000, of which $30,000 2. was the value of the land and $5 0,000 as the value of the building. Paid $10,000 in cash and signed a note payable for the remaining $70,000. Bought several computer systems on credit for $8,000 (30-day open account). 3. Obtained a loan from 2 nd Bank in the amount of $12,000. Signed a not e payable. 4. Paid the $4,000 account payable due as of December 31. 5. Instructions List the December 31 balances of assets, liabilities, and owners ’ equity in tabular form a. shown. Record the effects of each of the five transactions in the format illustrated in Chapter 2 of b. the text. Show the totals for all columns after each transaction.2- 4 Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.4A An Alternate Problem on Recording the Effects of Transactions The items making up the balance sheet of Smith Trucking at December 31 are listed below in tabular form similar to the illustration of the accounting equation in Chapter 2 of the text. Assets = Liabilities + Owners ’ Equity Cash + Accounts Receivable Trucks + Office Equipment = Notes Payable + Accounts Payable + Capital Stock Balances $4,700 $8,3 00 $72,000 $3,000 $10,000 $8,000 $70,000 During a short period after December 31, Smith Trucking had the following transactions: Bought office equipment at a cost of $2,600. Paid cash. 1. Collected $2,500 of accounts receivable. 2. Paid $2,000 of acco unts payable. 3. Borrowed $5,000 from a bank. Signed a note payable for that amount. 4. Purchased three trucks for $60,000. Paid $5,000 cash and signed a note payable for the 5. balance. Sold additional stock to investors for $25,000. 6. Instructions List the Decem ber 31 balances of assets, liabilities, and owners ’ equity in tabular form as a. shown above. Record the effects of each of the six transactions in the tabular arrangement illustrated b. above. Show the totals for all columns after each transaction.Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e 2- 5 © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2. 5A Preparing a Balance Sheet; Effects of a Change in Assets HERE COME THE CLOWNS! is the name of a traveling circus. The ledger accounts of the business at June 30, 2003, are listed here in alphabetical order: Accounts Payable ................ $ 25,000 Notes Payable ...................... $ 115,000 Accounts Receivable ................. 5,600 Notes Receivable ...................... 1,200 Animals ................................. 310,000 Props and Equipment ............ 108,000 Cages ....................................... 15,000 Retained Earnings ................... 89,000 Capital Stock ......................... 400,000 Salaries Payable ........................ 1,250 Cash .................................................. ? Tents ........................................ 40,000 Costumes ................................. 16,000 Trucks & Wagons ................. 125,300 Instr uctions Prepare a balance sheet by using these items and computing the amount of Cash at June a. 30, 2003. (After “ Accounts Receivable, ” you may list the remaining assets in any order.) Include a proper balance sheet heading. Assume that late in the evening of June 30, after your balance sheet had been prepared, a b. fire destroyed one of the tents, which had cost $10,000. The tent was not insured. Explain what charges would be required in your June 30 balance sheet to reflect the loss of this asset.2- 6 Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.6A Preparing a Balance Sheet – A Second Problem Shown below in random order is a list of balance sheet items for Apple Valley Farms at September 30, 2002: Land ..................................... $ 50,000 Fences and Gates .................. $ 14,100 Barns and Sheds ...................... 19,100 Irrigation System ..................... 10,200 Notes Payable .......................... 65,000 Cash ........................................... 9,300 Accounts Receivable ............... 15,000 Livestock ................................... 5,000 Apple Trees ............................. 84,000 Farm Machinery ...................... 20,000 Accounts Payable ...................... 8,100 Retained Earnings ............................ ? Property Taxes Payable ............. 4,700 Wages Payable .......................... 1,200 Capital Stock ......................... 100,000 Instructions Prepare a b alance sheet by using these items and computing the amount for retained a. earnings. Use a sequence of assets similar to that illustrated in Chapter 2 of the text. (After “ Barns and Sheds ” you may list the remaining assets in any order.) Include a proper h eading for your balance sheet. Assume that on September 30, immediately after this balance sheet was prepared, a b. tornado completely destroyed one of the barns. This barn had a cost of $4,500, and was not insured against this type of disaster. Explain wha t charges would be required in your September 30 balance sheet to reflect the loss of this barn.Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e 2- 7 © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.7A Preparing a Balance Sheet and Statement of Cash Flow; Effects of Business Transactions The balance sheet items for The City Butcher (arranged in alphabetical order) were as follows at July 1, 2003. (You are to compute the missing figure for retained earnings.) Accounts Payable ................. $ 7,000 Equipment and Fixtures ........ $25,000 Accounts Receivable ................. 8,200 Land ........................................ 50,000 Building ................................... 90,000 Notes Payable .......................... 40,000 Capital Stock ......................... 100,000 Salaries Payable ........................ 3,700 Cash .......................................... 4,100 Supplies ..................................... 7,000 During the next two days, the following transactions occurred: July 4 Additional capital stock was sold for $30,000. The accounts payable were paid in full. (No payment was made on the notes payable or income taxes payable.) July 5 Equipment was purchased at a cost of $6,000 to be paid within 10 days. Supplies were purchased for $1,000 cash from a restaurant supply center that was going out of business. These supplies would have c ost $2,000 if purchased through normal channels. Instructions Prepare a balance sheet at July 1, 2003. a. Prepare a balance sheet at July 5, 2003, and a statement of cash flows for July 1-5. b. Classify the payment of accounts payable and the purchase of suppl ies as operating activities. Assume the note payable does not come for several years. Is The City Butcher in a c. stronger financial position on July 1 or on July 5? Explain briefly.2- 8 Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.8A Preparing Financial Statements; Effects of Business Transact ions The balance sheet items of The Candy Shop (arranged in alphabetical order) were as follows at the close of the business on September 30, 2002: Accounts Payable ................... $ 6,800 Furniture and Fixtures ........... $ 9,000 Accounts Receivable ................. 5,000 Land ........................................ 72,000 Building ................................... 80,000 Notes Payable ................................... ? Capital Stock ......................... 100,000 Retained Earnings ................... 19,100 Cash .......................................... 6,900 Supplies ..................................... 3,000 The transactions occurring during the first week of October were: Oct. 3 Additional capital stock was sold for $30,000. The accounts payable were paid in full. (No payment was made on the notes payable.) Oct. 6 More furniture was purchased on account at a cost of $8,000, to be paid within 30 days. Supplies were purchased for $900 cash from a restaurant supply center that was going out of business. These supplies would have cost $2,000 if purchased under normal circumstances. Oct. 1-6 Revenues of $8,000 were earned and paid in cash. Expenses required to earn the revenues of $3,200 were incurred and paid in cash. Instructions Prepare a balance sheet at Se ptember 30, 2002. (You will need to compute the missing a. figure for Notes Payable.) Prepare a balance sheet at October 6, 2002. Also prepare an income statement and a b. statement of cash flows for the period October 1-6, 2002. In your statement of cash flo ws, treat the purchase of supplies and the payment of accounts payable as operating activities. Assume the note payable does not come due for several years. Is The Candy Shop in a c. stronger financial position on September 30 or on October 6? Explain brief ly.Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e 2- 9 © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.9A Preparing a Balance Sheet; Discussion of Accounting Principles Howard Jaffe is the founder and manager of Old Town Playhouse. The business needs to obtain a bank loan to finance the production of its next play. As part of the loan appl ication, Jaffe was asked to prepare a balance sheet for the business. He prepared the following balance sheet, which is arranged correctly but which contains several errors with respect to such concepts as the business entity and the valuation of assets, liabilities, and owner ’ s equity. OLD TOWN PLAYHOUSE Balance Sheet September 30, 2002 Assets Liabilities & Owner ’ s Equity Cash ..................................... $ 19,400 Liabilities: Accounts Receivable ............. 150,200 Accounts Payable ............. $ 7,000 Props and Costumes .................. 3,000 Salaries Payable ................ 32,0 00 Theater Building ..................... 26,000 Total Liabilities ......... $39,000 Lighting Equipment ................ 10,000 Owner ’ s Equity: Automobile ............................. 15,000 Howard Jaffe, _______ Capital ............................. 184,600 Total .................................... $223,600 Total ................................ $223,600 In discussions with Jaffe and by reviewing the accounting record s of Old Town Playhouse, you discover the following facts: The amount of cash, $19,400, includes $16,000 in the company ’ s bank account, $2,400 1. on hand in the company ’ s safe, and $1,000 in Jaffe ’ s personal savings account. The accounts receivable, listed as $150,200, include $10,000 owed to the business by 2. Dell, Inc. The remaining $140,200 is Jaffe ’ s estimate of future ticket sales from September 30 through the end of the year (December 31). Jaffe explains to you that the props and costumes were purchased s everal days ago for 3. $18,000. The business paid $3,000 of this amount in cash and issued a note payable to Ham ’ s Supply Co. for the remainder of the purchase price ($15,000). As this note is note due until January of next year, it was not included among t he company ’ s liabilities. Old Town Playhouse rents the theater building from Time International. The $26,000 4. shown in the balance sheet represents the rent paid through September 30 of the current year. Time International acquired the building seven year s ago at a cost of $180,000. The lighting equipment was purchased on September 26 at a cost of $10,000, but the 5. stage manager says that it isn ’ t worth a dime. The automobile is Jaffe ’ s classic 1935 Olds, which he purchased two years ago for 6. $12,000. He re cently saw a similar car advertised for sale at $15,000. He does not use the car in the business, but it has a personalized license plate that reads “ OTPLAY. ” The accounts payable include business debts of $6,000 and the $1,000 balance of Jaffe ’ s 7. personal VISA card. Salaries payable include $30,000 offered to Robin Needelman to play the lead role in a 8. new play opening next December and $2,000 still owed to stagehands for work done through September 30.2- 10 Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 When Jaffe founded Old Town Playhouse several years ag o, he invested $20,000 in the 9. business. However, New Theatre, Inc., recently offered to buy his business for $184,600. Therefore, he listed this amount as his equity in the above balance sheet. Instructions Prepare a corrected balance sheet for Old Town Playhouse at September 30, 2002. a. For each of the nine numbered items above, explain your reasoning in decided whether or b. not to include the items in the balance sheet and in determining the proper dollar valuation.Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e 2- 11 © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Problem 2.10A Preparing a Balance Sheet ; Discussion of Accounting Principles Hit Scripts is a service-type enterprise in the entertainment field, and its manager, Joe Debit, has only a limited knowledge of accounting. Joe prepared the following balance sheet, which, although arranged satisfac torily, contains certain errors with respect to such concepts as the business equity and the asset valuation. Joe owns all of the corporation ’ s outstanding stock. HIT SCRIPTS Balance Sheet November 30, 2002 Assets Liabilities & Owner ’ s Equity Cash ........................................ $ 5 ,000 Liabilities: Notes Receivable ...................... 4,000 Notes Payable ................ $ 65,000 Accounts Receivable ................. 3,000 Accounts Payable .............. 32,000 Land ........................................ 60,000 Total Liabilities ....... $ 97,000 Building ................................... 75,000 Owner ’ s Equity: Office Furniture ......................... 9,600 Capital Stock ..................... 10,000 Other Assets ............................ 2 5,000 Retained Earnings ............. 74,600 Total .................................... $181,600 Total ................................ $181,600 In discussion with Joe and by inspection of the accounting records, you discover the following facts: The amount of cash, $5,000, includes $2,000 in the company ’ s bank account, $1,200 on 1. hand in the company ’ s safe, and $1,800 in Joe ’ s personal savings account. One of the notes receivable in the amount of $600 is an IOU that Joe received in a poker 2. game five years ago. The IOU is signed by “ G.W., ” whom Joe met at the game but has not heard fro m since. Office furniture includes $2,500 for an Indian rug for the office purchased on November 3. 15. The total cost of the rug was $10,000. The business paid $2,500 in cash and issued a note payable to Jana Carpet for the balance due ($7,500). As no pay ment on the note is due until January, this debt is not included in the liabilities above. Also included in the amount for office furniture is a computer that cost $800 but is not on 4. hand because Joe donated it to a local charity. The “ Other Assets ” of $25 ,000 represent the total amount of income taxes Joe has paid 5. the federal government over a period of years. Joe believes the income tax law to be unconstitutional, and a friend who attends law school has promised to help Joe recover the taxes paid as soon as he passes the bar exam. The asset “ Land ” was acquired at a cost of $15,000 but was increased to a valuation of 6. $60,000 when a friend of Joe offered to pay that much for it if Joe would move the building off the lot. The accounts payable include busines s debts of $30,000 and the $2,000 balance owed on 7. Joe ’ s personal MasterCard.2- 12 Alternate Problems to accompany Williams/Haka/Bettner/Meigs, Financial Accounting , 11e © The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2003 Instructions Prepare a corrected balance sheet at November 30, 2002. a. For each of the seven numbered items above, use a separate numbered paragraph to b. explain whether the treatm ent followed by Joe is in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.